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Reception, Reputation and Circulation in
the Early Modern World, 1500-1800

Moore Institute
National University of Ireland, Galway
22-25 March 2017

This international conference brought together scholars working on the reception of texts, the reputations of authors and individuals, and the circulation of people and things in the early modern world.

To view paper abstracts, click on the ‘Abstracts’ button below.

To listen to podcasts from the conference, click on the links below.

Plenary session 1:  Networks of Circulation

Ruth Ahnert (Queen Mary University of London) and Sebastian Ahnert (Cambridge), ‘Reconstructing Correspondence Networks in the State Papers Archive’

To listen to the podcast, click here.

Robin Buning (Huygens ING), ‘Collecting Biographies of the Members of Samuel Hartlib’s Circle: A Prosopographical Approach to Networking the Republic of Letters’

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Julia Flanders (Northeastern), ‘Writing, Reception, Intertextuality: Networking Women’s Writing’

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Parallel session 1A:  Nuns, ‘Whores’, and Language

Emilie Murphy (York), ‘“that we might have means to learn French”: Language Competence and Acquisition in English Convents in Exile’

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Heather Froehlich (Strathclyde), ‘Writing the Whore in Early Modern Drama’

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Parallel session 1B: Routes of Communication

Nina Lamal (St Andrews), ‘From the Battlefield: The Circulation of Soldiers’ Letters during the Dutch Revolt’

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Ingeborg van Vugt (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa/University of Amsterdam), ‘Mapping the Prohibited Book: Using Multi-layered Networks to Disclose the Early Modern Book World’

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Plenary session 2:  Queens

Rosalind Smith (Newcastle, Australia), ‘“Daughter of Debate”: Untangling the Poetic Reputation of Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots’

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Micheline White (Carleton), ‘The (In)visible Queen: The Circulation of Unattributed Prayers by Katherine Parr’

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Parallel session 2A:  Career Authors and Reputation

Nina Geerdink (Utrecht), ‘Bread and Branding: The (Self-)Representation of Female Dutch Authors Writing for Profit’

Thomas Colville (King’s College London), ‘Thomas Burnet’s Rotten Egg: Recovering Intellectual Reputation through Digital Archive Excavation’

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Esther Villegas de la Torre (University of Nottingham/Universitat Pompeu Fabra), ‘Gender, Print, and Fame in Seventeenth-Century Authorship’

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Parallel session 2B:  Reputations Lost and Found

Ramona Wray (Queen’s University Belfast), ‘Cary and the Crypt: Memory, Materiality and Maternity in the Tanfield/Cary Archive’

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Natasha Simonova (Oxford), ‘“Upon the Shelves of the Learned”: The Reception History of Unpopular Books’

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Violetta Trofimova (St. Petersburg State University), ‘Across Boundaries: Comtesse de la Suze and her Elegies in Early Modern France, England and Russia’

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Plenary session 3:  Reception and Orality

Katherine Larson (Toronto), ‘Texts in and of the Air: The Matter of Song’

 

Parallel session 3A:  Receptions in Drama and Music

Xuege Wu (Queen’s University Belfast), ‘“My heart to Salome is tied too fast to leave her love for friendship”: The Tragedy of Mariam and the Reception of Classical Friendship’

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Lindsay Ann Reid (National University of Ireland, Galway), ‘The Fair Maid of Dunsmore’

 

Parallel session 3B:  Paratexts, Translation, Networks: Receptions of Spanish Writing

Nieves Baranda (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia), ‘Assessing Reception, Reputation and Circulation through Women Writers’ Paratexts in Early Modern Spain’

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Jessie Labadie (Randolph-Macon College), ‘The Afterlife of Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor’s Novellas in France’

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Plenary session 4:  Cross-Cultural and Cross-Temporal Encounters 

Gillian Dow (Southampton), ‘“If it’s a flop, too bad for the author; we’ll claim it’s a literal translation”: Reviewing Women Writers in 1750s Britain’

Jerome de Groot (Manchester), ‘Fugitives, Fields, Pubs and Trees: Constructing Memory and the Royal Oak’

 

Parallel session 4A:  Reputations on the Move: Vitae of Nuns and Saints

Jennifer Hillman (Chester), ‘Mademoiselle de Vienville and her “glorious enterprise”: Writing the Life of Mère Mectilde du Saint-Sacrement (osb)’

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Danielle Clarke (University College Dublin), ‘Teresa de Avila, Translation, Reception and Generic Innovation’

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John McCafferty (University College Dublin), ‘Brigid of Kildare: Stabilizing a Wandering Early Medieval Saint’

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Parallel session 4B: Brits and Books: The British Book Trade at Home and Abroad

Michael Durrant (Bangor), ‘“Suit Trouble”: Henry Hills’ Posthumous Reputation’

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Rachel Schnepper (Grinnell College), ‘Networks of Belief and Production: Digital Humanities and the Revolutionary English Book Trade’

Daniela Giosuè (Università degli Studi della Tuscia), ‘Bargaining for Books in Early Modern Europe: The Example of Some Seventeenth-Century British Travellers’

Parallel session 5A:  Managing One’s Reputation: Manuscript vs. Print Circulation

Jessica Maratsos (American University of Paris), ‘By Hand and by Press: Vittoria Colonna in Circulation’

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Magdaléna Jánošíková (Queen Mary University of London), ‘“Bees swarmed against me”: Eliezer Eilburg, a Sixteenth-Century Jew: Mending Reputation in the Context of the Polish-Jewish Golden Age’

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Yvonne Noble (Canterbury), ‘The Occlusion of Anne Finch’

 

Parallel session 5B:  Literary Interchanges: France and the Four Kingdoms (England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland)

Peter Auger (Queen Mary University of London), ‘Du Bartas and the “Pizza Effect”’

Mary Chadwick (Huddersfield), ‘The Bread and Butter Chronicle: Authorship, Reception and Community in Manuscript Magazines’

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Wes Hamrick (National University of Ireland, Galway), ‘Thomas Gray, Alexander Pope and “British” Literary History’

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Plenary session 5: Matter, Materiality and Circulation

Juliet Fleming (New York University), ‘Where Is On?’

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Helen Smith (York), ‘Miscellany Madames’

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Parallel session 6A:  Irish Women’s Correspondence: Reception and Connections

Ann-Maria Walsh (University College Dublin), ‘The Boyle Sisters: Collaborating, Facilitating, and the Familial Correspondence Network’

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Michelle DiMeo (Chemical Heritage Foundation), ‘Lady Ranelagh, Natural Philosophy and Ireland: Corresponding with the Hartlib Circle, 1656-59’

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Naomi McAreavey (University College Dublin), ‘The Reputation and Networks of the Duchess of Ormonde’

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Parallel session 6B:  Visual Representations and Reception

Karen Lloyd (Stony Brook), ‘A Disembodied Devotion: The Peruvian Madonna of Copacabana in Early Modern Italy’

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Michele Osherow (Maryland), ‘Keeping the Girls in Stitches: Working the Susanna Narrative in Seventeenth-Century Embroidery’

Leah Knight (Brock), ‘The Art of Evidence and the Evidence of Art: Textual Reception in Anne Clifford’s Great Picture’

 

Plenary session 6:  Irish Book History

Marc Caball (University College Dublin), ‘Worlds of Knowledge: Books and their Owners in Early Modern Ireland’

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Jason McElligott (Marsh’s Library, Dublin), ‘Un-Enlightened Readers: Stealing Books in Eighteenth-Century Dublin’

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Plenary session 7:  Confessional Networks

Liesbeth Corens (Cambridge), ‘English Catholic Counter-Archives: Creating a Community without Borders’

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Jaime Goodrich (Wayne State), ‘Reading the Network: Comparative History and the English Benedictines of Pontoise’

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Parallel session 7A:  Annotation, Commemoration and Misattribution: Receptions of Herbert and Donne

Joel Swann (Portsmouth), ‘Early Annotators of The Temple (1633)’

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Jenna Townend (Loughborough), ‘“Or something like it, for I han’t the Book by me”: Misquotation, Misattribution, and the Reception of George Herbert’s The Temple (1633)’

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Charles Green (Birmingham), ‘“A Tomb your Muse must to his Fame supply”: A Survey of Seventeenth-Century Commemorative Elegies, Graffiti, and Annotations on John Donne’

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Parallel session 7B:  Aphra Behn: Literary Sources and Acts of Reception

Gillian Wright (Birmingham), ‘Aphra Behn’s “Voyage to the Island of Love”: Sources and Influences’

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Claire Bowditch (Loughborough), ‘Translation and Collaboration: Aphra Behn and the Inns of Court’

Elaine Hobby (Loughborough), ‘The Performance and Publication of Aphra Behn’s The Rover in the Early Modern World’

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Plenary session 8: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Temporal Encounters II

Alexander Samson (University College London), ‘The Translation, Dedication and Circulation of Spanish Books in Early Modern England’

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Eleanor Rycroft (Bristol), ‘Engaging the Twenty-First-Century Audience with Early Modern Plays’